Tag Archive | yoga

Taking a Twist on Hairbands the Damage Free Twistband

 I received several samples for review.  I was not compensated in any way, all opinions are my own and freely expressed.

image Normally I prefer reviews be just that, my opinion, but honestly there is not too much to say about a hair band, is there?  I will be upfront – hair ties that are tight and rubber band like do give me headaches, they pull on the roots of my hair, I experience breakage, etc.  When I opened the delightful little carton for review I was not that impressed.  When I stepped into a local boutique and saw similar items priced at $14 for 3 I was even less impressed thinking “WOW! How can I put a review together that does not discuss that these are 300 times the cost of hair ties you can pick up at any convenience store, or even *Gasp* the one buck shops?” But then I gave them a try.  I may not personally spend $3 on one hair tie but I can honestly say the Twistband is not your average hair tie.  I would bet that the headbands are also quite nice – not the squeeze your brain out of your ear feel I normally get.  I could even see them being perfect for babies if you go in for adorning your little miss with bows – a flower or bow could easily be sewn on.  The company also offers shoelaces, gifts, customization and limited edition pieces.  These could easily become the new collectible for fashionistas.

Right now they are offering free shipping, loyalty points and even a monthly subscription service. These would make a great gift at baby showers, bridal showers, for the yoga lover in your life, as goody bag stuffers, giveaways and incentives! Check out a little more on how this woman owned company got its start:image

Meet the Founder: Jessica Frandson

Like all great inventions, Twistband was born out of necessity. After having a baby, Jessica Frandson grew tired of having her hair tugged by the little one and quickly learned the least painful hairstyle for a new mom was a ponytail. She made sure to always have her hair up and kept a second band on her wrist as a backup. Traditional hair bands hurt her head and her wrist, so she twisted a soft piece of elastic trim to hold back her hair, thus creating the first Twistband. A few weeks later she was looking to write down a phone number and in the absence of a notepad, she wrote the number onher Twistband, and the custom message Twistband was born. In 2009 she officially launched the Twistband brand and began selling the product at retail stores nationwide. Jessica serves as the president of Twistband, overseeing all aspects of the emerging brand.


All about Twistband

We all remember the days of the hair scrunchy. Easy to wear, enough styles to match any outfit, and they slid comfortably on your wrist between wearings. But as style evolved, our once-beloved scrunchy became a fashion “don’t,” creating the need for a new breed of hair accessories. Elastic bands tug on hair, cause headaches and can leave dents in your hair when you take it down. But with the introduction of the Twistband that is all about to change.
Twistbands are ponybands and headbands made of elastic trim. They stretch to support any hairstyle, yet are slim and sleek enough to wear on your wrist when you want to let your hair down. Twistbands are available in a variety of colors, patterns and fabrics to complement any style. And with prices ranging from $5-12 for a set of three you can have one in every color!
Twistbands are offered in a wide range of styles and collections to suit anyone or any need, including couture and fashion, athletics, toddlers through tweens, and licensed and branded logos and messaging. In addition to the fashion Twistbands sold at retail, the line is also available for corporate and promotional branding. The ponybands and headbands can be printed with logos or messages, making them a perfectly unique and stylish way to spread your word.
Twistbands provide a slew of uses beyond a hair accessory. Wear it as a bracelet; wear a branded Twistband to make a statement; commemorate a bachelorette or birthday party with custom-printed bands … the uses are endless!

Twistband:

http://www.thetwistband.com

Price Range: $3-$12

#KindAwesome Win a Trip to #Wanderlust California Sweepstakes

This is a sweepstakes offered by Kind bars.  I am in no way involved in Wanderlust or prize fulfillment, in consideration for this post I did receive samples of Kind bars. 

Brush up on your sun salutation because your downward dog could win you a trip to the world’s leading yoga festival.  Want in? Snap a pic you’re your most #kindawesome yoga pose and upload it to the Facebook app for a chance to win a trip for 2 to Wanderlust California at Squaw Valley (7/18 – 7/21) including roundtrip airfare, 4 nights of lodging and 4-day Wanderlust Sage festival passes.

The contest will run from May 29 to June 16th.

dragonfly

You Could Be Pain Free in 75 Minutes for Less than 20 Bucks

Seriously, you can be.  I am and no I am not going to one of those crappy big chain massage places.

While I have been a yoga teacher for over 1o years I have not always taken the best care of my personal yoga practice.  Running a fitness studio, being a doula and parenting three children did not leave me enough time for my own personal effective yoga practice.  Well, that is a little bit of an untruth.  The real reason I am in pain is because I had not yet let go of ego.

Yes, I said it.  I have in the past had a larger ego than I currently do. Not the healthy type of ego either that keeps us alive and choosing the path of self preservation.  I indulged in the type of unhealthy ego that many individuals with body image disorders do – that ego that compares you and your self worth with everyone else around you.  My ego in particular liked to prey on my feelings of insecurity around my weight and being in an industry fraught with lean, toned, almost impossible to attain bodies bending into ridiculously compressed positions.  So for me, the more I pushed myself into poses, the harder I worked my muscles, the more I ached after a class, or the further I went into a pose the less I worried about people perceiving me as “less than” because of my fuller figure.

I also ran my own business which required me to teach until 40 weeks pregnant, and go back to work less than 2 weeks postpartum in order to pay rent, instructor’s salaries and for groceries.  I wasn’t the type of newly liberated woman who could make the statement  “I’m skipping maternity leave because my job is important” – I would have loved to stay home and relax with my newborns for even a full six weeks, I can’t imagine saying no to a paid maternity leave of any type.

The stage was set for pain.  Ten pound babies, 40 classes a week teaching aerobics and power yoga with hundreds of planks takes a toll on the pregnant and postpartum body.  Sixteen months after my daughter was born I was still experiencing searing pain in my SI Joint (posterior near the hip) and buttocks, my inner groin (I suffered through diastasis symphysis pubis, something I wouldn’t wish on anyone) and my lower back.  I made old man sounds every time I got off the couch, so many that my little sponge of a daughter started to grunt when she would stand up in solidarity with me.

What changed? I started teaching a prenatal yoga class at Yoga-Rhythms in Lisle, IL.  Years ago I used to take Svaroopa yoga with the same owner at a different location, many pounds, children and years ago when I was youthfully flexible and in class just to relax after a workout.  Now I attend classes every two days to manage my pain and release anxiety. And it works. Really works. If you let go.

Letting go is supposed to be a big part of yoga – letting go can’t truly occur if you are getting dressed up with $150 yoga pants to go to class for whatever the reason – because you can, because everyone else does, because your butt looks great, because you saw an ad for them – you are possessed by your possession still. You haven’t let go if you intensely stare at yourself in a mirror while instructed to push yourself as far as possible while your body goes through the stages of heat stroke – and shocker – the teacher leading you isn’t teaching yoga. I’m sorry to say this and I know some people will disagree ardently with me on these points but there is nothing to argue about.  If you care how you look in a pose, if you care about being seen in class, if you care about how far you can go or if you are addicted, drawn to a certain name on the marquee, only feel like you get something out of the practice if you look like you escaped from somewhere, are drenched, red faced, sore – you get the picture – you aren’t practicing true yoga. You are stagnant, stuck within the Annamaya kosha. I was once there too so I know it can seem as though you are truly practicing yoga and you may be going through the motions, making a good show, even living a very yogic life – I was but I wasn’t truly practicing.

blnk Yoga is about “removing the root cause of suffering and pain.” The first sign that my yoga practice wasn’t authentic were anxiety and panic attacks.  Then came pain. I could also say then came some medical conditions (tumors, gallstones, questionable skin tags, etc) but that may not be a fair assumption.  To those on the outside I had a steady yoga practice and taught daily but to me I was missing something – missing that feeling of bliss.  Sure, I took classes where I felt good at the end, felt like I stretched or got a workout, learned something new – but the bliss was missing.

Then I started taking Svaroopa classes again and the bliss blew back into my being it rode in on a stack of blankets.  I left the first class a little sore and if you saw the class from the outside looking in you would have a “What the? How could that be?” expression on your face.  The style is beyond gentle, it involves lots of blankets and propping – lots of letting go and even more self awareness.  You can’t get through more than 5 minutes of a class without hearing “Do you notice the difference?” or “Does it feel different?” or “How do you feel now?” you get the idea, teachers want you to contemplate your practice, something that is missing in many of the fly by night certifications out there. Teachers in this lineage receive a great deal of training I can attest as a yoga instructor with a great deal of training behind me that I had to let go of.  It isn’t that Svaroopa Yoga (now in its 21st year) is that far removed from “ normal yoga” – it is truly ingrained in the heart of yoga – it just isn’t as capitalized or commercialized and that may be why you haven’t heard of this amazing answer to pain problems.

For me it has been a journey of letting go not just of pain but of that evil ego.  Every time I mention this in class a teacher will say “Why do you have an ego about this?” or “why wouldn’t you want to use more blankets, don’t you want to feel bliss?” I do, I do! But my ego has a hard time admitting that all of these years I have been over stretching ligaments and tendons, listening to instructors tell me to go “more straight” or “deeper” into a pose and all the time piling on more pain for myself.  Its hard to look around a class and see “normal students”, average sized men and women of all ages not pushing themselves.  There is no-one to be “more flexible than” no-one to compare myself to and that was the hardest part – realizing my self worth isn’t tied to anyone else’s.

This revelation couldn’t have come at a better time – I’m ready to move on from teaching yoga and start a new/old career in academic teaching.  I have been practicing Vipassana meditation more seriously and learning to wish peace and loving kindness to others in situation where I once may have compared/judged myself. I’ve taken it a step further into wishing happiness to others in their situation instead of feeling jealous or dejected and it is very liberating to be detached. 

Four, maybe five weeks have passed and each class I attend I find new areas to release, I come up against new blocks now that I am getting into the muscles instead of stretching superficial tissues and I am pain-free. The potential to be pain free in one class really does exist, but the more you go – the more you let go. 

Childcare Workers, Parents, Teachers Creative Yoga for Children can Help get Kids Active

image Ever wondered what to do with your kids during a rainy day or, even more fitting, a snowy day? Have you ever wondered what a Montessori class experience is like or how your children would respond to teaching in a different, more integrative way?

Q. In Creative Yoga for Children you mention that part of your inspiration for writing the book came from your own teaching experience at a Montessori school. How does Montessori education complement yoga? What are the challenges in bringing yoga into non-Montessori schools?

A. I observed so many similarities between yoga and Montessori that I incorporated it into my classroom curriculum as
soon as I had finished my yoga training. Both are completely noncompetitive and concern themselves with an ever
evolving process, and not any end product. Both are personal, and are there to further the development of the person,
and not for “producing” something for someone else. Also they are both philosophies that increase self-esteem,
concentration, and self-awareness. It is easy to add yoga to a Montessori classroom, as it just becomes a piece of
material that the child can choose to do when they prefer, but adding it to the routine of a traditional classroom does not have to be difficult. Yoga can simply be a three- or four-minute activity added on to the day, practiced in between subjects, as a sort of “warm down,” or “warm up” to the next activity. Guided meditations and relaxations can be added into a class just before tests, in order to further focus the children’s minds. Teachers can use yoga as a tool throughout their daily routines.

If you were not aware, a recent study by California State University, Los Angeles found that yoga improves students’ behavior, physical health, academic performance, and attitudes toward themselves. A perfect resource for schools seeking to incorporate yoga and mindfulness programs into their curriculum, or for parents to encourage body-mind awareness at home, Creative Yoga for Children promotes physical, emotional, and social development through stress reduction, movement, and free exploration.
Montessori and registered yoga teacher Adrienne Rawlinson presents forty one-hour lessons in a fun, accessible fashion to allow children ages 4–12 to learn at their own pace and in a cross-curriculum fashion. Activities are broken down by age categories, and each includes setting an intention, physical warm-ups, breath work, specific yoga poses, meditation and gratitude exercises, and more.

This book is a cornucopia of ideas and I love the variety of lesson plans given.  I especially appreciate the objectives (intention) and educational elements sections as a teacher.  Although many of my classes are taught without these, when I teach in environments that receive federal money for education programming many of them require objectives and educational elements to be outlined.  Truly, even with my decade of experience teaching yoga I could not have written a more complete book.  Many of the lessons were similar to ones I myself already teach, but there were definitely some new ones I had not thought of and elements added in that I have not explored, such as using “cardboard letters” in a 4-6 year old lesson on words and sounds.  This book would be ideal for homeschooling families and starts with lessons for children as young as four.

Q. Your book is broken down into three age groups (4–6, 7–9, 10–12). What is the significance of starting at age 4? Is there a benefit to starting earlier or is this the earliest age for kids to become actively engaged with yoga?

A. The program offered in my book is quite structured and I have observed that children under the age of four benefit more from a yoga routine that is more playful, and they are developmentally often not ready for a structured one hour class. However, they are not too young to be introduced to the world of yoga. I have two and a half year olds in my Montessori class who love to do a few minutes of yoga every day, choosing pose cards from a basket to do on a mat by themselves or with a friend. Babies and toddlers can reap the benefits of yoga and there are many age appropriate
programs out there. Setting the stage for a lifetime of yoga benefits really starts at birth.

Rawlinson provides a wonderful backdrop for teachers and parents to create their own fun and integrative yoga practice for the children in their lives.  But what if you are afraid of the chaos that could ensue after starting this undertaking? The author provides a great bit of sound advice, so now there is no reason to fail to introduce the children in your life to yoga!

Q. How do you bring focus back when kids get distracted in class?

A. The children sometimes get very boisterous and silly when doing some of the group activities and games, so it is important that I have an effective way of bringing them back to center and calm them, so they are ready for the next part of the class. I usually introduce chimes, a Tibetan singing bowl, or a special gong of some sort at the beginning of class. I ring it to let them know that they should come back to their mats, sit in their favorite sitting pose, and get ready to listen. They are generally wonderful at responding to this.

 

About the Author:
A graduate of Queen’s University in Kingston, Ontario, Adrienne Rawlinson is a certified Montessori teacher and registered
yoga teacher. She studied yoga under Maureen Rae in Toronto and Erich Schiffmann in Chicago. Knowing that she wanted to
offer the gift of yoga to children, she put together her program, drawing from her yoga and Montessori teaching experience, and
she began offering afterschool and weekend workshops to children in her area. She currently teaches Montessori and yoga in
Oakville, Ontario.

I received no compensation for this post, the opinions expressed are my own, some material was provided by a third party.

Breastfeeding Doesn’t Require Soundproofing -How Not to Handle Your Business

image I was psyched up to attend a workshop on physical adjustments this Friday.  I had  the day off, my husband and I devised a plan to take the boys downtown and if needed I could feed the baby – the workshop was only between 1-4pm so he would only possibly need to eat once. I called to make sure there was a lobby area to feed in, the staffer said yes and to just give my name and show up – no problems.  Over retentive as I am I decided to follow up with an email. Here is the reply I received….

“Thanks for your interest in our CEC workshop on Physical Adjustments. I am
happy to register you, however I did speak with our front desk staffer
from last night and he mentioned that you might have a baby with your
husband  in the front room. Unfortunately, he didn’t consider that at the
time of the workshop our office is closed and we couldn’t just have
someone hanging out in there for several reasons. Also, I think it might
be disruptive as there isn’t sound proofing between the spaces and we will
be doing some meditation work.
Let me know if you still plan to attend, we would be more than happy to
have you. If not, we are planning on offering these CEC workshops on a
regular basis so perhaps in a few months it would work better for you.”

Here’s the thing-  this time and date work best for me, which is why I was set to attend, I’ll still be nursing in a few months and I don’t find it inconvenient.  Meditation and the 8 limbs of yoga involve pratyahara (sense withdrawal and the idea that you retreat inside yourself and away from stimuli) not that you would need it while I nurse – breastfeeding is pretty quiet – not something that needs sound proofing, being located in the city alone requires soundproofing to practice yoga in a bubble.

As for not having someone milling around the lobby – I never said they would be.  I simply asked if they could accommodate my husband bringing my newborn in to nurse if  needed.  I have made similar requests with the Chicago Thai Massage School – they were more than happy to have a nursing mom student (I just couldn’t commit the finances this month to start) and Phoenix Rising Yoga Therapy which includes physical adjustments, meditations, silence, etc – without a problem.

Originally while pregnant I had the finances set aside and wanted to complete the Thai Massage program and spoke with Paul on the phone – he came straight to the point – that there would be poses and techniques I could not do, so having me in the program would not be prudent or safe for me and others.  He wasn’t wishy washy trying to say they preferred I not come without saying stating so.

My PRYT training while 7.5 months pregnant at Moksha didn’t have sound proofing, they have multiple studio spaces and a large lobby area and people were simply respectful and quiet as they passed between it to the restroom, etc.  They also did not have someone on staff during every minute of the training but accommodated out of town spouses who read in the lobby (and actually did hang around). That’s what makes some places a success, actually embodying the idea of yoga and realizing that their students can do so as well.

In the end I think this provides an invaluable lesson in any service based industry – there are ways to handle situations and still come out on top.  This email did not leave me wanting to sign up for a workshop later on, or feel as though I am truly welcome at this one.  If you read this email and truly pay attention to the wording you may get the same feeling I did – maybe not.

Tracey Mallet Fuse Dance Cardio Lean DVD Feel the Burn

Having been a fitness professional for the last 10 years I have seen a lot of DVDs and fitness fads come and go. I was intrigued by Fuse Dance Cardio Lean as it promises a blend of jazz, ballet and pilates.  This is not a new concept in the fitness field, everyone is looking to fuse pilates with a variety of other formats – in fact there are other ballet, pilates, yoga fusions on the market.

What I liked most about these DVDs over others I have watched is the energy that Tracey brings to the material, the quality of the production and the upbeat tempo of the music. Music and setting can make or break a workout DVD and this one has what you need to get your grooving.

I would have enjoyed Erica, the participant doing modifications, to have been closer to the camera, and maybe some other modifications shown.  There also was not a lot of direction given on how to protect the body from some of the moves, especially for some of the core type movements that were a bit fast paced.

This video was definitely a challenge, but it went by quickly and the burn was noticeable next day – similar to the Ballet Bootcamp class I run – I didn’t notice the intensity until I tried to walk the next day. I also caution that I had to shorten my range of motion a great deal, my joints could not keep up with the bouncing and rapid movements through some of the repetitions, especially on the curtsies.

The floor work was also challenging and may not be accessible to everyone, but those looking for a new challenge will love it. Again, Erica would have been better closer to the camera, in the second row and many times was not modifying. Tracey is a very warm instructor, quite authentic and not over bearing, her smile seems truly genuine and it was a pleasure watching her.

Her FuseDance Cardio Melt DVD picks up where the Cardio Lean left off, starting with salsa moves and sexier style. Again, funky upbeat music is a big attraction of this DVD too. Fifteen minutes in, third circuit, there is a re-introduction to the long, lean ballet inspired moves and some bouncy floor work that might be too much for those with sensitive joints.

Fourth Circuit plays with a little burlesque and hip-hop inspired moves, truly the DVD spans many genres but all in a fitness inspired manner.  There is not difficult choreography to follow, instead Tracey brings repetition and slow building combinations so participants never feel like they need to stop and figure out what is going on.

The second workout starts with free weights and kickboxing, I’m not sure how much weight the ladies are working with, but I’d say it looks like 5lbs, which seems a little high for the moves they are doing.  Swinging iron weights does come with inherent risks of muscle tears, and strain. For those in excellent condition, this may be a nice challenge, for those starting with free weights they may want to attempt to learn correct lifting form in a stationary format first.

Check Tracey out online at http://traceymallett.com

“I am thrilled to announce the release of my new DVD series,” says Mallett.  “FuseDance ™ Cardio Melt and FuseDance™ Cardio Lean incorporate all of the fun, high-energy dance moves my workouts are known for while being low impact on your joints, making them great for people looking to work up a sweat at any fitness level.”

Best known for her dancing and choreography skills, Mallett has created workout programs perfect for everyone, from the time-crunched individual to the postnatal mother.  Having sold over 1 million copies of her best-selling DVDs, Mallett has revolutionized the modern workout making it suitable for everyone.  She is a growing media presence in the United States and abroad, and recently led First Lady Michelle Obama, Ellen DeGeneres and a group of eager school children through a fun, blood-pumping workout on Ellen.

ABOUT TRACEY MALLETT

Tracey currently owns her own studio in Los Angeles, and spends her time certifying others worldwide in The Booty Barre® technique. Other certifications she holds include: group fitness instructor through the Aerobics and Fitness Association of America (AFAA), certified sports nutritionist with the National Association of Sports Nutrition (NASN), BASI Certified Pilates Instructor, Pilates Method Alliance, and Level 1 Gyrotonic Instructor. She is a fitness contributor for the Los Angeles Times and appears regularly in publications including Prevention, Shape, Fitness, Women’s Health and more, and on television on programs including Good Morning New York, Access Hollywood, and more.

I was contacted to review two new exercise DVDs by Tracey Mallett, I received no compensation and the opinions given are my own.

CamelBak Goes to Wanderlust Get Hydrated and Get Yoga

Are you planning to embark on a weekend of yoga, music, wine tasting and farm-to-table dining at Wanderlust (Vermont’s visit is June 21-24)?  I spent a month in Vermont at a teacher training several years ago and I can say for sure it is a beautiful and mostly underdeveloped area – in a nature loving way.  That can make it hard to find cell service and even water fountains.

Well, with the help of CamelBak, Wanderlust, the largest multi-day yoga event in the world, is expanding its commitment to make it the most socially and environmentally conscious event of its kind, with the goal of being a zero-impact event.

image CamelBak, the go-to source for personal hydration, is helping this goal by reducing bottled water waste, providing free freshly filtered water at filling stations around the festival.

In addition to their yoga mat, camera and sunscreen, party goers should also pack a reusable water bottle to take full advantage of the CamelBak filling stations.

How to party like a yogin:

Stay hydrated: Every attendee should consume at least eight 8-ounce glasses of water each day. That’s 64 ounces x four days for a grand total of 256 ounces. That means that without CamelBak filling stations each yogi would need to purchase 16 single-use disposable plastic bottles.

Visit the Beauty Bar: The premier on-site location for the beautiful women and men of the Wanderlust community to sample hair and skin care products from some of the country’s greatest organic, natural and high-quality botanical beauty lines.

Enjoy a Farm-to-Table Dinner: All of that stretching, sweating and dancing works up an appetite. Sit among friends and enjoy curated, fresh, locally grown foods from surrounding farms for a nourishing feast.

Speakeasy: Attend a unique lecture series on subjects pertaining to the mindful life.

Body massage: The Wanderlust Healing Sanctuary offers services from some of the most talented healers across the country.

I was contacted by CamelBak to review their water bottles, I received no compensation and the opinions are my own.

Prior to the email I receive I was not familiar with CamelBak to be honest, but I did have a life altering experience that made me realize how important keeping healthy and active with my family is, so I bought my hubby a bike and my little ones bike seats at our local Spokes bicycle store – where low and behold they sell CamelBak water bottles.  So I bought 3 for us to use, the Podium Big Chill:

  • Hydration Capacity: 25 oz (750 ml)
  • CamelBak® Got Your Bak™ Guarantee: If we built it, we’ll Bak it™ with our lifetime guarantee.
  • Double-wall construction keeps water cold twice as long as regular sport bottles
  • Large 25 oz (750ml) water capacity
  • Innovative, self-sealing Jet Valve™ eliminates splatters and spills.
  • Lightweight, easy-squeeze bottle delivers the right flow to quench your thirst

These are great to take on long bike rides in 90 degree weather, I was not a big fan though of having to tilt the water bottle back, and I wind up keeping the cap unlocked all of the time for convenience when I bike back and forth to Sky Yoga Studio.

I received for review two AWESOME water bottles that were entirely different from those I bought.

First let me say I love the minimal packaging only the spout was covered with plastic to protect it.

I received an Eddy:

  • Hydration Capacity: 32 oz (1 L)
  • CamelBak® Got Your Bak™ Guarantee: If we built it, we’ll Bak it™ with our lifetime guarantee.
  • Redesigned cap and bite valve provide faster flow and enhanced durability
  • Flip, Bite and Sip. No tipping required (though possible: just remove the straw)
  • New redesigned bottle shape; 1L size lets you drink more, refill less
  • Dishwasher Safe: All parts are top-rack dishwasher safe
  • Durable and spill-proof
  • Easy to carry: Integrated loop handle makes it easy to clip a carabiner or carry with the crook of a finger
  • 100% BPA-Free
  • Wide-mouth opening is easy to fill with ice and water and a breeze to clean
  • New CamelBak® Big Bite™ Valve is compatible with CamelBak® eddy™ and CamelBak® Groove® bottles

And the Eddy Insulated (shown right)image

  • Hydration Capacity: 20 oz (.6 L)
  • CamelBak® Got Your Bak™ Guarantee: If we built it, we’ll Bak it™ with our lifetime guarantee.
  • Redesigned cap and bite valve provide faster flow and enhanced durability
  • Double-Wall bottle keeps water cool and reduces condensation
  • Flip, Bite and Sip. No tipping required (though possible: just remove the straw)
  • Durable and spill-proof
  • Easy to carry: Integrated loop handle makes it easy to clip a carabiner or carry with the crook of a finger
  • 100% BPA-Free
  • Wide-mouth opening is easy to fill with ice and water and a breeze to clean
  • New CamelBak® Big Bite™ Valve is compatible with CamelBak® eddy™ and CamelBak® Groove® bottles

I absolutely adore these bottles, they come with internal straws so no breakage like you get with those beverage store recyclable drink glasses – which might I add are not backed by a guarantee – I can’t tell you how many times the double insulation has broke on those or cracked – so far my CamelBak has outlived them, and even if it doesn’t they Bak their CamelBak!

Checkout the colors on the Eddy Insulated – perfect for Wanderlust and any yoga loving person needing hydration – I have never seen a waterbottle that makes me feel happy when I look at it! Flip, Bite, Sip it couldn’t be easier or quieter.  I like to drink a little during the end of Power Yoga – after teaching for 60 minutes I work up a thirst, opening water bottles is noisy, sipping through a straw or a squirt bottle water bottle makes cracking or slurping noises – the CamelBak? SILENCE, loved it!! I finally could feel guiltless as I hydrated while students rested in Savasana.

CamelBak is BPA free and can be washed in the dishwasher on the top rack so what is there not to love about these bottles?

They are also reasonably priced to the counterparts – at between $12-20 a reusable glass from retail stores will run you that much and not endure half as well. CamelBaks are so great to use even my 3 year old loves them and my 6 month old teethes on the soft mouthpiece. Definitely a must have for active families- each bottle fits snuggly in my bike water bottle rack (generic metal). You can even purchase different colored bite valves so the whole family can customize their hydration experience.